Monday, December 7, 2009

Sam's Report

(Sam is one of my friend's sons.)

Hey Barret its sam im doing a report on the invention of the electric guitar a musical innovation and heres some questions: How do you think the electric guitar changes Jazz? Do you think rock would be as it is if it werent for the electric guitar? Do you think the electric guitar made a huge difference in music or not?

Hi Sam,

The electrification of the guitar made it loud enough to move out of its previous role as a supporting rhythm instrument in jazz bands and into sharing the lead spot with saxes, trumpets, and clarinets. One of the first major jazz guitarists was Charlie Christian with Benny Goodman's band. Musicians still study Charlie Christian's playing today. The guitar is a good instrument to play jazz on because it can provide chordal accompaniment like a piano, and also play expressive single note lines like a sax or trumpet, or shift quickly between both roles in rapid succession, sometimes even doing both at once. A good example of this chord-melody style of playing was Joe Pass.

The popularization of solid-body electric guitars and basses by Les Paul and Leo Fender made even louder volumes possible without feedback problems. This in turn made it easier for bands to play loud enough to fill a venue with sound with fewer microphones and less equipment needed overall. Rock music in part became successful because entertainment for a large audience could be provided by just 4 or 5 musicians instead of a bigger group. Instead of a big bus and a large entourage, you could start with a van and a few dedicated members.

The electric guitar has advantages over other instruments in its tonal flexibility; it's a very expressive instrument, with body types, pickups, effects, and amplifiers all creating huge variety in tone. It's also got lots of visual appeal because 1) you can move around the stage or dance while playing it, and 2) its playing position makes it easy for people to watch each note being produced. This is harder to see on a keyboard or wind instrument.

The answer to your final question is yes. Without electric guitar there are many kinds of music that would probably not even exist: rock, metal, punk, and modern blues.

Saturday, November 21, 2009

twitter posts

My twitter username is BarrettTag. (Yes, that's ttT in there.)

http://twitter.com/BarrettTag

Trying to tie blog posts, tweets, and other updates together.

Friday, October 30, 2009

Intro Lick from "Wrecked on the Sirens' Rocks." You can play it!


Click the play button below to start the half-speed version.


Click here to load the notation in a separate page.



The rectangular marks represent downstrokes of the pick. The V's are upstrokes.

Monday, October 12, 2009

Dan's Major Triad Diagrams

After his post, Dan replied with some nice diagrams he made of the major triads. You can see these and many more at his website.



Root Position



First Inversion





Second Inversion


Saturday, October 10, 2009

The 12 close-voiced triads

Dan writes:
>
> Hello Barrett,
>
> I'm a beginning guitarist, and I've been working my way
> through your "Guitar Fretboard Workbook". It is a great
> workbook, and I really like your style of "read it, write
> it, play it" which really helps me learn.
>
> As you state late in Chapter 22, I've been constructing a
> final project workbook with all sorts of shapes, chords,
> scales, and arpeggios. However I am confused by one item.
> You recommend to make diagrams of 72 triads (12 major, 12
> minor, etc.). I cannot figure out how to come up with 12
> major triad chords. In chapter 14 you show five patterns of
> each triad and then talk about inversions, but I still can't
> figure out how you come up with 12. Did you mean 15? Five
> triad patterns plus five first inversions plus five second
> inversions?
>
> Please let me know how to come up with a good practice list
> for triads.
>
> Thanks, Dan
>


Hi Dan,

The last sentence on page 44 of Chapter 14 says, "We will divide each (triad shape) into four small three-string shapes..."

Here is another way to look at it that I think you'll find helpful.

If you stay on one stringset (a group of adjacent strings), there are three triad voicings. Play this example on the top three strings for D major.

-2--5--10-----
-3--7--10-----
-2--7--11-----
--------------
--------------
--------------

Those are, in order, 2nd inversion, root position, and 1st inversion.

On the next string set, the same D major triad goes like this:
--------------
-3--7--10-----
-2--7--11-----
-4--7--12-----
--------------
--------------
Those are 1st inversion, 2nd inversion, root position.

Following this systematic exhaustion we have 4 possible sets of adjacent strings: 321 432 543 654. Multiply that 4 by the 3 inversions on each stringset and you get 12 close-voiced triads.

Here are the major triads on the other two stringsets.

--------------
--------------
-2--7--11-----
-4--7--12-----
-5--9--12-----
--------------

-------------
-------------
-------------
-4--7---12---
-5--9---12---
-5--10--14---

The list does not yet include any open-voiced triads like this, which would greatly increase the number of permutations:

-5-
-3-
---
-4-
---
---

Some of the inversions are shared by two root shape/pattern numbers. For example, this voicing is shared by Pattern 2 and Pattern 3.

---
-7-
-7-
-7-
---
---

Thanks for your mail, and congratulations on finishing the book.

All the best,
Barrett

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Does One Book Include the Stuff in the Other?

> Hey Barrett,
>
> I was webshopping for a good book on learning the
> fingerboard. Been playing guitar for over 30 years and bass
> for over 15 years, but the fingerboard has continued to
> elude me.
>
> Your books look promising, and I am interested in the
> Fretboard workbook or the Chord Tone Soloing book. However,
> I've read in several reviews that the first is sort of
> incorporated in the latter. So if I buy Chord Tone, will I
> need the other one?
>
> Also, if you are familiar with the guitargrid system
> (www.guitargrid.com), can you explain how your system is
> different?
>
> I hope you can clarify this. Like many musicians, I have
> loads of books already, but I have been disappointed so many
> times.
>
> Thanks, Alex V.

Hi Alex,

Thanks for writing. Since your stated purpose in the first line of your email was to learn the fingerboard, I would say you should get the Guitar Fretboard Workbook first. That is exactly what it teaches.

In the reviews there are people who prefer the Fretboard Workbook over Chord Tone Soloing, and vice versa. The books are not the same. Chord Tone Soloing is slightly more advanced, so generally speaking I (and some other teachers who use both books) recommend the Fretboard Workbook first. The amount of years you've already played (30) may or may not have a bearing on the decision. I can't tell from here.

The Fretboard Workbook drills you with diagram exercises on every kind of shape: roots, intervals, scales, arpeggios, and chords. It is foundation for both lead and rhythm work.

Chord Tone Soloing does have a chapter that covers those shapes, but there are no specific written exercises for them. Instead this book spends most of its time helping you prepare yourself to hit the right notes over any chord progression you might encounter while soloing.

I tried to take a look at the sample lesson at guitargrid.com, but it said displaying samples would "reveal key elements of the entire method," so they couldn't show them. That means I can't evaluate it!

I think any decent book will show you the material; its success does not depend on any secrets but instead on the clarity of its writing, and whether it gives you assignments to force you, the student, into doing the work. That's what I've learned in my 22 years as a GIT instructor. Teachers must give lots of assignments or the student will gloss over the material.

Thanks again, and I wish you the greatest rewards on the guitar.
Barrett

Sunday, March 15, 2009

Practicing Harmonized 3rds and 6ths Within Patterns

Hey Barrett,

I am incorporating the Guitar Fretboard Workbook and Chord-Tone Soloing into my newly dedicated practice regime. Well done!

I have a question. I am starting off my sessions with playing 2 of the 5 scale shapes in one key doing the descending 2,3,4, and five note patterns demonstrated on pg 30 of CTS then in melodic 3rds and 4ths. Tough but great. I want to move on to the Diatonic 3rds and 6ths but I am confused.

On pg. 34 it shows the C going up in thirds with the C scale on the G string and then in 6ths with it on the B. I think how I can see how to practice them on adjacent strings but I don't know how to practice them within each of the five patterns.

Am I missing something or is there somewhere you can point me to get an idea of how to practice them?

I have been a guitar maker for years, acoustic and electric, so if you need anything or have a question please feel free to ask. I also make and repair pickups if you ever have one crap out on you.

Thanks again and continued success,

Andrew
****************************
Hi Andrew,

Thanks for buying and using my books. I applaud your addition of diatonic 4ths to your practice regime, because it shows initiative. Those are not explicitly demonstrated in the book.

You need to shift between at least two adjacent scale patterns in order to play harmonized 3rds throughout a key, because it's not possible for a string to produce two fundamental pitches at once. With 6ths, this problem does not occur, so we'll be able to play them entirely within a single fingering pattern.

You did not say which two of the five patterns you have learned, so they might not be adjacent ones.

Starting from square one then, here is one octave's worth of Pattern One in D major. Play the first note with your little finger. Memorize the scale.

D major, Pattern One
------------------
-------------2-3--
---------2-4------
---2-4-5----------
-5----------------
------------------

Now learn this ten-note chunk of Pattern Two in D major. This one should start with the middle finger.

D major, Pattern Two
---------------------
-----------------5-7-
-----------4-6-7-----
-----4-5-7-----------
-5-7-----------------
---------------------

The pitches of the scale are named with letters, like this:
D E F# G A B C# D

or with scale degree numbers like this:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Notice these numbers are SCALE DEGREES, not fret numbers.

To start harmonized 3rds, we play scale degrees 1 and 3 (D and F#) together. We can think of these as part of Pattern One or of Pattern Two of the scale, because they are common to both.

---
---
---
-4-
-5-
---

Next we'll play scale degrees 2 and 4 (E and G) together. These notes cannot be played simultaneously in Pattern One because they'd be on the same string, so we move up into Pattern Two.

---
---
---
-5-
-7-
---

To get the next two-note chord (also called a double stop), we'll shift back into Pattern One. The two notes can't be played together as a chord in Pattern Two. The notes are F# and A, scale degrees 3 and 5.

---
---
-2-
-4-
---
---

The next 3rd-interval double stop is from scale degrees 4 to 6, G to B. These are common to Pattern One and Pattern Two.

---
---
-4-
-5-
---
---

Now we are up to degrees 5 and 7 of the scale: A and C#. We are in Pattern Two again.

---
---
-6-
-7-
---
---

Next, degrees 6 to 8. These are back in Pattern One.

---
-3-
-4-
---
---
---

We're going to learn at least one octave's worth of harmonized 3rds here, so we need to keep going. This is 7 to 2 in the scale, C# to E.

---
-5-
-6-
---
---
---

Now here's 1 to 3 again, but an octave higher than where we started.

---
-7-
-7-
---
---
---

After some practice of the above steps, we get this: a D major scale harmonized in 3rds with minimal shifting.

------------------------------------
-----------3-5-7---7-5-3------------
-----2-4-6-4-6-7---7-6-4-6-4-2------
-4-5-4-5-7---------------7-5-4-5-4--
-5-7---------------------------7-5--
------------------------------------

For harmonized 6ths, shifting out of one position is not required because the notes are far enough apart to never risk being on the same string.

-------------5-7---7-5--------------
-------5-7-8-----------8-7-5--------
-4-6-7-----4-6-7---7-6-4-----7-6-4--
-----4-5-7---------------7-5-4------
-5-7---------------------------7-5--
------------------------------------

Of course, shifting out of position will be required if we want to continue the pattern into higher or lower registers of music, so don't stop with just the examples I showed you. Learn it all over the place, and move it to all the other keys!

Thanks for your question, it is a good one.

With your permission I'd like to send you free mp3s from my new CD, with hopes that if you like it enough, someday you might pick it up.

Here's the title track:
http://monsterguitars.com/cd01/Barrett_Tagliarino-02-Throttle_Twister.mp3

Feel free to share it with as many friends as possible.

Thanks again,

Barrett
http://monsterguitars.com

Saturday, March 7, 2009

the dominant 13 sus 4 chord

> Hi Barrett
>
> I just came across an interview you did, talking about
> showing paul gilbert
> some 13sus4 chords! cool stuff.
>
> I like to take chords and then learn them all over the
> neck..
>
> what formula should I use? should I drop any notes out?
>
> and mainly how would I use them in context?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Aaron

Hi Aaron,

I should correct you there. I did not "show Paul" 13sus4 chords! He knew how to play them when he came over, but wanted to talk about playing over them and how their compositional uses were explained in theory. Just being clear, he already knows a lot and has a great ear, but is constantly improving himself musically.

An A13sus4 chord may contain any or all of these pitches:

1 4 5 b7 9 13
A D E G B F#

You'd often leave out the 9th or 5th. Or leave out the root and let the bass player cover it.

Guitarists can voice it like this in 5th position with a 1st finger barre:
A E G D F# A

You'd first use this chord in the same place you'd use a dominant 7th chord in a major key, on degree V. In D major that V is A13sus4.

There are many other places dominant chords get used, as I'm sure you know. In the blues, the I, IV, and V are all dominant. All may be suspended and extended if you like the sound.

In any place where the triad of the intended functional target of a dominant chord is major, you can try a 13sus4. So in a D major tonality you can try an E13sus4 (V of V) along with the I and V.

Because the 4th is covering up the 3rd in the chord you can also just think of E13sus4 as Em13 with no 3rd, a substitute for Em7.

If you want to switch modes a little, you can use B13sus4 in the key of D major and switch to D Lydian in your melody when the chord occurs. You will get B Dorian over the B13sus4 chord.

The rule for use of dominants also applies to minor keys, so in the key of B minor you can try E13sus4: V of VII, A13sus4: V of III, and D13sus4: V of VI (though you'll have to switch to B Phrygian in the melody because of the C note here).

In nontraditional composition, 13sus4 chords can be used to create parallel harmony phrases. Think of the top note as a member of a pentatonic scale and slide the whole chord around, creating a simple melodic riff with the top note.

Those are the main applications; there are probably lots more.

Thanks for writing, and with your permission I'd like to send you links to mp3s from my latest record. Feel free to share with friends.

Barrett

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

CAGED system vs. Pattern Numbering

Kit said...

Hi Barrett, I really appreciate your Fretboard Workbook - great stuff. Would you be able to clarify one thing for me? I've been really helped by memorizing the 5 Major Scale "patterns" but why do the CAGED shapes get numbered differently so CAGED position 1 = E shape = pattern 4? Thanks again for producing a great book.

Kit
*********************
Barrett says:
THANKS KIT!

Hopefully I get what you're asking. I'll try explaining how the CAGED system works from a couple of different perspectives and how it relates to the pattern numbering system used in my books and in all Musicians Institute guitar curricula.

First, as we move a specific fingering shape around the fretboard to different keys, we want it to be identified by the same pattern name --- be it C, A, G, E, or D --- or by a pattern number: 1, 2,3, 4, or 5. That way we know how to put our fingers down.

For example, when we have the index finger on string 2 and the ring finger on string 5 as in the following tab, that's Pattern One in the key of C. These are both C notes. In the CAGED system, this is the C shape.

-----
-1---
-----
-----
-3---
-----

If we move the hand up the neck by two frets, that's still Pattern One, but now it's in the key of D. In the CAGED system, this is called a C shape or form, but these are both D notes.

-----
-3---
-----
-----
-5---
-----

Move it up another two frets and it's still Pattern One, but this time it's in the key of E. These are both E notes. In the CAGED system, an "E root shape of the C form," if you will.

-----
-5---
-----
-----
-7---
-----

Now another perspective. We want consecutive pattern numbers for shapes that connect up the neck. First look at Pattern One of C again. In the CAGED system, this is the C.

-----
-1---
-----
-----
-3---
-----

If we want to play C patterns higher up the neck, we will prepare by placing our index finger in the spot formerly occupied by the ring finger.

-----
-----
-----
-----
-3---
-----

The addition of another C note on the third string gives us Pattern Two of C. Notice this high C is the same pitch as the one we played on the second string.

In the CAGED system, this is called the A shape---because it resembles the roots of the first A chord we learn in open position (and that is the only reason).

-----
-----
-5---
-----
-3---
-----

Next, by placing our index finger on the higher C we prepare to play Pattern Three of C.

-----
-----
-5---
-----
-----
-----

Pattern Three has roots on the 6th, 3rd, and 1st strings. There are three C notes here. (I don't expect a beginner to play all three at once.) In the CAGED system, this is the G shape---because it resembles the roots of a G chord in open position.

-8---
-----
-5---
-----
-----
-8---


By placing our index finger on the place formerly occupied by the pinky, we prepare to play Pattern Four of C. You can barre all the way across the fretboard for this.

-8---
-----
-----
-----
-----
-8---


The addition of the ring finger on fret 10 completes Pattern Four roots in the key of C. In the CAGED system, this is the E shape---because it resembles the roots of the E chord in open position.

-8---
-----
-----
-10--
-----
-8---

A similar process, moving the index finger up to fret 10, gives us the Pattern Five root shape for C. In the CAGED system, this is the D form---because it resembles the roots of the first D chord we learn in open position. That is the only reason for the "D form" name. There is nothing else inherently "D" about it. These are both C notes.

-----
-13--
-----
-10--
-----
-----

Pattern One occurs again next, with the index finger on the 13th fret. These are both C notes.

-----
-13--
-----
-----
-15--
-----

Moving on up, we get another instance of C roots in Pattern Two. Again, the CAGED system refers to this as an "A" form, because it resembles the roots of an A chord when played in open position.

-----
-----
-17--
-----
-15--
-----

Right now it may seem like no big deal to call a chord with these roots a "C Chord of the A Form," but later you'll encounter additional layers of complexity, as when you apply substitute chords on top of each other.

For example, one way to make a C chord sound much jazzier would be to play an E chord instead, just keeping C as the bass note.

First play this:
-----
-5---
-5---
-5---
-3---
-----

then this:
----
-5--
-4--
-6--
-3--
----

Using pattern numbers for reference, the upper part of this chord is a Pattern One E major, that we've superimposed over the Pattern Two C chord.

Using the CAGED System for reference, the upper part of this chord is a C-form E major, that we've superimposed over the A-form C chord.

Either way is correct, but I find the first way of looking at it to be easier. The chord doesn't look much like an open-position A, and I've already got two other chords with letter names to think about: C and E.

Another name for this chord is Cmaj7#5. It is a Pattern Two chord, because its roots are on strings 5 and 3. (Although since the root does not need to be duplicated, the 3rd string is used for another chord tone here.)

I'd also use a Pattern Two scale over the chord. In this case, the scale is C Lydian Sharp 5, Pattern Two.

-----------------------4-5-4---------
-----------------3-5-7-------7-5-3----
-----------2-4-5-------------------5-4
-----2-4-6----------------------------
-3-5----------------------------------
--------------------------------------

The Pattern Two roots of the scale are, as always, on strings 3 and 5.

-----
-----
-5---
-----
-3---
-----

That last example was meant to show that there are situations that may be better served by using pattern numbers than the CAGED system alone. I'm not expecting you to be familiar with either the chord or scale presented.

It also shows that the pattern numbering system works the same for scales as the chords they are played on top of in the same fretboard position.

Monday, February 9, 2009

Tablature/Notation Book for Throttle Twister

All guitar parts on the entire CD, including guest solos, are transcribed in both tablature and traditional notation for you in an 8.25" by 11" book! At amazon.


Saturday, January 24, 2009

New CD is available today, (Jan. 24, 2009)

The title is Throttle Twister. Eleven tracks of rock guitar instrumentals.

Guitar: Barrett Tagliarino
Bass: Alexis Sklarevski
Drums: Jon Rygiewicz
B3 on tracks 5 & 9: Steve Welch
Guest appearances by Paul Gilbert and Scott Henderson.

You can order it straight from the CD duplicator here. Check it out even if you're not buying! The cover is very cool, done by Ari Baron & Plushie the Pinstriper. Click the "Rotate Case" button at the upper left to see the back of the CD box.

You can stream all the songs in their entirety and download one for free at last.fm, and I will rotate free tracks on a monthly basis so you can download them all for free --- if you are willing to take eleven months to collect them! Contact me if you want to be notified of those mp3 releases.

There will also be a complete transcription book of all the guitar parts, expected to be available in a couple of weeks. I wrote it all out myself, so: what appears in the book will be what was really played.

Thanks!

Barrett Tagliarino

Barrett Tagliarino